Do You Have a Scuba Diving Certification?

Written by Recreation Magazine on June 21, 2017. Posted in Scuba diving lessons, Scuba diving lessons dc, Scuba training

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Initialisms and acronyms merited a post this week on the Merrian-Webster Twitter account. The inviting photo of a deep water SCUB diver was pictured staring into the camera, and the purpose of the post was to talk about the difference between words like SCUBA and FBI. The linked article goes on to explain the precise term that is used for abbreviations that actually serve as well know words. While no one would argue that FBI is a word, some people know that SCUBA actually stands for self contained underwater breathing apparatus. Know more for its word status, SCUBA is more correctly identified as an initialism, while FBI is a simple acronym.
Enough with the deep language talk, though. When the Summer Solstice arrives underwater diving fans are hardly thinking of linguistics. Instead, they are likely planning their next Cayman Islands diving trip, updating their scuba diving certification, and talking other friends and family members into getting their beginner scuba diving classes scheduled.
Summer Scuba Diving Trips Make for Great Family Vacations
The desire to deep into the waters of the world can be contagious. What may start as a simple single lesson at a local diving club can quickly turn into an obsession to get enough hours in to conquer the next diving adventure. Whether you are a first time diver or you are an experienced scuba diving fan, one of the draws of this sport is that there is always a new location to visit, a new friend or family member to introduce to the wonders of deep sea diving and the advantages provided by taking a scuba diving course.

  • In 1968, there were fewer than 12 thousand member certifications for the Professional Association of Diving Instructors; by the year 2008, that number had risen to 17.5 million members.
  • 500,000 people become certified SCUBA divers every year in the U.S.
  • Every year, millions of dives occur in the U.S. alone, with only 90 deaths reported a year worldwide.
  • 80% of all diving related problems involve the head and neck, and among recreational divers most of these are problems with the auditory system.
  • An estimated 6 million active scuba divers enjoy the sport worldwide as of 2013.
  • Increasing from 275,000 in 2011 to 567,000 in 2015, the number of young adults who participate in scuba diving has been on the rise.

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